Quick Answer: What Does An AXE To Grind Mean?

What means AXE?

noun plural axes a hand tool with one side of its head forged and sharpened to a cutting edge, used for felling trees, splitting timber, etcSee also hatchet.

an axe to grind.

an ulterior motive.

a grievance..

What does the idiom an AXE to grind mean?

A selfish aim or motive, as in The article criticized the new software, but the author had an ax to grind, as its manufacturer had fired his son. This frequently used idiom comes from a story by Charles Miner, published in 1811, about a boy who was flattered into turning the grindstone for a man sharpening his ax.

Can’t cut the mustard meaning?

When you use the expression ‘Can’t Cut the Mustard’ you mean that someone is unable to succeed or meet expectations. Example of use: “I really like Jake, but he just can’t cut the mustard.”

What is the meaning of gift of the gab?

Meaning: Someone who has the ability to speak well. Example: Lawyers are often born with the gift of the gab.

What is the meaning of to end in smoke?

If something ends in smoke, it produces no concrete or positive result. This expression refers to the boasting by a person, of having put in a lot of efforts by him, for a particular cause or to attain a result which is very difficult to be done by any person.

What does the phrase bury the hatchet mean?

Bury the hatchet is an American English idiom meaning “to make peace”. The phrase is an allusion to the figurative or literal practice of putting away weapons at the cessation of hostilities among or by Native Americans in the Eastern United States.

What is the origin of have an AXE to grind?

Of American-English origin, the expression to have an axe to grind (American-English spelling ax) means to have a private reason for doing, or being involved in, something. It has often been attributed to Benjamin Franklin [note 1].

What does the idiom a finger in every pie mean?

For example, When they nominated me for the board, I’m sure Bill had a finger in the pie. Another form of this idiom is have a finger in every pie, meaning “to have an interest in or be involved in everything,” as in She does a great deal for the town; she has a finger in every pie.

Why is it called Dressed to the nines?

One theory is that it comes from the name of the 99th Wiltshire Regiment, known as the Nines, which was renowned for its smart appearance. Why it should have been to the nines rather than to the eights, to the sevens, etc. …

What does cut the cheese mean?

Verb. cut the cheese (third-person singular simple present cuts the cheese, present participle cutting the cheese, simple past and past participle cut the cheese) (Canada, US, idiomatic, euphemistic, slang) To flatulate.

What is an example of an AXE to grind?

When I see him strongly supporting someone who could be his rival, I cannot help but think that he has an axe to grind. He has no political axe to grind, he is just concerned about the state of affairs here. I think he is gunning for the top job because he has an axe to grind with some of his colleagues.

What does Fanny’s your aunt mean?

This expression was first coined in 1887. … A phrase with the same meaning is ‘Fanny’s your aunt’. When used together it means complete or the whole lot. If Bob’s your uncle and Fanny’s your aunt you’ve got a full set of relatives and you are complete.

How do you have an AXE to grind with someone?

To have an axe to grind is to have a dispute to take up with someone or, to have an ulterior motive; to have private ends to serve.

Is it spelled ax or AXE?

Ax and axe are different spellings of the same word. There is no difference in meaning or pronunciation. … But you will see axe in American English fairly frequently. Many dictionaries say that “ax” is the most common spelling in the U.S. You will find the shortened form in compound names such as pickax and poleax.